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Mast Cell or Histiocytoma
12-22-2016, 07:20 PM,
#1
Mast Cell or Histiocytoma
Hi All,

First time poster here. I'm posting because my Boxer/Pit mix has a pink growth on his face. I am going to the vet next week but I'm super stressed out over what this bump is. The pink bump appeared over night about 5 weeks ago. It has grown a little bit. I am obsessing over this bump but I need to wait until after the holidays to have him examined as we just moved.  I posted a picture and would like some opinions. I want to avoid the emergency vet if possible... 


My dog is 2 yrs old and the bump is above the skin and pink. It does not bother him (just me.) He is acting fine.


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12-23-2016, 10:49 AM,
#2
RE: Mast Cell or Histiocytoma
(12-22-2016, 07:20 PM)Juliet5381 Wrote: Hi All,

First time poster here. I'm posting because my Boxer/Pit mix has a pink growth on his face. I am going to the vet next week but I'm super stressed out over what this bump is. The pink bump appeared over night about 5 weeks ago. It has grown a little bit. I am obsessing over this bump but I need to wait until after the holidays to have him examined as we just moved.  I posted a picture and would like some opinions. I want to avoid the emergency vet if possible... 


My dog is 2 yrs old and the bump is above the skin and pink. It does not bother him (just me.) He is acting fine.

No need for an emergency Vet.  Exhale, and schedule a Vet appointment for after the holidays.  I'm working on scheduling surgery for my 14 yrs old puppy to have a nasty inflamed large lipoma removed in Jan.  Dogs problems always occur around the holidays. Wink

Possibilities include:

Benign growths such as "skin tags" (inc warts), cyst, allergic reaction to an insect bite.

Or as you have suggested a Histiocytoma, or the beginning of Mast Cell.  

In a dog just 2 yrs old the probability is high it's benign.  Try to measure it's size, and keep track of it, until you can get into a Vet.  Usually a cancerous growth will proceed rapidly with blood engorgement.   Your picture shows it doesn't look "angry".  But as with everything there are exceptions.  If it should become inflamed or break open while awaiting for a Vet appointment, then triple antibiotic salve is a good strategy.

Feel along on the dog's neck to check for any swollen lymph nodes.  When you visit the Vet ask them to show you where the major lymph nodes are (e.g. neck, shoulders, rear legs).  It will come in handy later on as your puppy gets older.
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12-23-2016, 12:01 PM,
#3
RE: Mast Cell or Histiocytoma
There is really no way one can tell what a growth is by just looking at a picture other than a few skin conditions that are very typical but then again, one can still be wrong at times. There are several possibilities for a growth like the one your dog has. My 5 year old dog once had one similar in the elbow area and it turned out to be a follicular cyst. Mast cell tumors are known as the great imitators because they can resemble many other more "innocent" skin problems. It's one of the main reasons why many vets aren't comfortable saying what a growth is, (even if it looks like an innocent growth) without having it aspirated first.

Mast cell tumors typically account for up to 20 percent of all tumors affecting dog skin, so the percentages aren't that scary to make you overly concerned. However, I know you have recently moved, but why not try to fit the appointment in with your schedule today or tomorrow? Just a quick phone last minute call (so you don't get all anxious before it) asking if they have any space for a needle aspirate. Not because it's an emergency, but for your peace of mind so you can relax.

A needle aspirate is very quick and often in office they can tell you by exclusion whether it's mast cell or not. Mast cell typically produces cells that can be easily identified by the vet with a microscope, they can then send out to the sample if you want to have it evaluated by a pathologist, but often just the vet's evaluation is good enough.

But again, if you cannot fit it in with your schedule, don't fret over it, enjoy time with family and then keep us posted on your vet's findings. Best wishes!
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