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Psychomotor seizures
08-18-2017, 10:31 PM,
#1
Psychomotor seizures
Looking for any info on psychomotor seizures, anyone have dog that has these?
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08-19-2017, 04:49 PM,
#2
RE: Psychomotor seizures
I have not personally had a dog with this condition, but my sister did. Her dog had what's called fly-biting seizures. What info were you exactly looking for?
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08-20-2017, 05:05 PM,
#3
RE: Psychomotor seizures
I'm not feeling very trusting of vet, I guess. No real explaination, no treatment, no prognosis...have called as well as seen several times and the frequency and amount of time in seizure is extending.  What is the normal time span most dogs spend in this state when it occurs?  There have not been any test of any kind and when I inquired about doing test etc the response was it requires anesthesia, and I was OK so? But still nothing.    Are these nothing to be concerned about? Huh  because it really worries me.
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08-20-2017, 07:16 PM,
#4
RE: Psychomotor seizures
(08-20-2017, 05:05 PM)Cisrocks Wrote: I'm not feeling very trusting of vet, I guess. No real explaination, no treatment, no prognosis...have called as well as seen several times and the frequency and amount of time in seizure is extending.  What is the normal time span most dogs spend in this state when it occurs?  There have not been any test of any kind and when I inquired about doing test etc the response was it requires anesthesia, and I was OK so? But still nothing.    Are these nothing to be concerned about? Huh  because it really worries me.

Causes could range from Epilepsy, metabolic disease, anemia, past head trauma, encephalitis, strokes, brain tumor.

Ask your Vet to make a referral to a local Vet specialty hospital, or a Vet school which is in reasonable driving distance.   The minimum testing they will want to perform will likely be a MRI of the head, along with a full blood panel.  The MRI is expensive.  You would need to discuss the diagnostic options with your Vet specialist.

There is no normal time span for seizures.  It may stabilize or increase in duration, and severity depending on the root cause.   Some causes such as Epilepsy can be stabilized or decrease in frequency with drugs.  Finding a metabolic disease as a possible cause, and treating it, might eliminate seizures. Obviously a growing brain tumor will progress, and get worse. 

Since your dog is getting worse,  the sooner the root cause can be determined, the better the likely outcome.
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08-21-2017, 08:06 PM,
#5
RE: Psychomotor seizures
(08-20-2017, 07:16 PM)dragondawg Wrote:
(08-20-2017, 05:05 PM)Cisrocks Wrote: I'm not feeling very trusting of vet, I guess. No real explaination, no treatment, no prognosis...have called as well as seen several times and the frequency and amount of time in seizure is extending.  What is the normal time span most dogs spend in this state when it occurs?  There have not been any test of any kind and when I inquired about doing test etc the response was it requires anesthesia, and I was OK so? But still nothing.    Are these nothing to be concerned about? Huh  because it really worries me.

Causes could range from Epilepsy, metabolic disease, anemia, past head trauma, encephalitis, strokes, brain tumor.

Ask your Vet to make a referral to a local Vet specialty hospital, or a Vet school which is in reasonable driving distance.   The minimum testing they will want to perform will likely be a MRI of the head, along with a full blood panel.  The MRI is expensive.  You would need to discuss the diagnostic options with your Vet specialist.

There is no normal time span for seizures.  It may stabilize or increase in duration, and severity depending on the root cause.   Some causes such as Epilepsy can be stabilized or decrease in frequency with drugs.  Finding a metabolic disease as a possible cause, and treating it, might eliminate seizures.  Obviously a growing brain tumor will progress, and get worse. 

Since your dog is getting worse,  the sooner the root cause can be determined, the better the likely outcome.
Reply
08-22-2017, 01:34 PM,
#6
RE: Psychomotor seizures
In older dogs, a brain tumor should be excluded. At times, even after testing, a real cause may not be found. In that case, the seizures are called "idiopathic." Vets will often not prescribe medications unless the seizures take place with a certain frequency. If you are not satisfied with your vet, you can always see a veterinary neurologist for more in depth information and testing.
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